Help4CHHIP

Melody of the Mind CIC

This CIC was set up for a range of activities, all under the general heading of advancing the Christian faith.  The areas of focus are on the use of creative and intellectual skills, including improving collaboration amongst Christian creatives, and on supporting vulnerable Christians in general, but aiming to have a specific focus on converts persecuted by their former co-religionists, and those who have suffered pastoral abuse.  

It was set up by Nathanael Lewis, an author, theologian, composer, song-writer and 'improvisational pianist', among other things.  He has also previously done a lot of work relating to human rights of Christians in Pakistan.  


(Company number 11631558). 

Helping us to help you.  

One of Melody of the Mind's goals is to set up an affordable global Christian collaborative community platform to enable effective co-operation in the areas of creativity, as well as research and in the doing of good and helping the vulnerable.   If you would like to know more, get in contact.    

Currently, they are especially looking for Christian creatives in the following areas to form the initial nucleus of the new community - musicians, video makers and editing, and app development, although anybody else is welcome to sign up.  The aim is to wait until there is a suitably large body of interested people before launching the community platform, ideally at least 50 people or more.  


Any Christian creatives who want to get involved in using their skills to help this campaign for Pakistani Christians are welcome to get in touch too!  


You can either use the form on our contact page, or email us at 'info@' and our domain name melodyofthemind.com.  


We also have several young UK based Pakistani Christians who have volunteered to help out behind the scenes.   

Our ethos - to be trustworthy stewards

Most of us in the team have seen and experienced first hand the less fragrant side of the charity and aid world, by which we mean, specifically, the Christian charity scene (and this is not to denigrate the excellent work that is done in the field).  We are aware that there can be all sorts of less than ethical practices out there, ranging from people popping up online claiming to be collecting for some particular need relating to Pakistani Christians, but who are, or certainly appear to be, total scams, to charities claiming to help out by using someone’s prominent story to front their fundraising effort, but never actually doing anything on their behalf (one or two team members have first or second hand experience of that happening), or else setting out stories as if they had single-handedly saved the day in a particular situation, when in fact, other charities had done far more, and far more willingly (again several team members have first hand experience of this). 

 

So, we are not going to be chasing headlines or glory, bigging ourselves up by making claims that are out of all proportion to what we have done, or anything like that.  As best we can, we will tell it plain and simple.  If we have the ability to get funds to a particular situation that we write about, we will say so, and if not, we may use a story to demonstrate the kind of things we help out with, or that Pakistani Christians face, but will be careful not to imply that we can directly help that case, or have more influence or contact than we do.  If we have given to a particular case, but we know that we were not the only ones, we will make that clear, and never imply we have had a greater role than we actually have.  We won’t be jumping on bandwagons – yes, if a relevant story hits the headlines we will mention it, but we won’t claim or imply we are able to directly help, unless we genuinely actually do. 

 

Where we have a promise from someone to pay for a particular matter, we will continue to advertise that cause until the pledge is fulfilled (as the promise may fall through).  After we know that the cause is paid for, we will update the original blog post, or report in a new blog post the good news. 

 

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The other side to the trust issue is, of course, that even if you can trust us that we are not on the make, how do we know that we ourselves, although sincere, are not being scammed?  A valid question, as it is not uncommon for people to try and scam charities or non-profit organisations, unfortunately.  Melody of the Mind brings two initial contacts whom the main director has had dealing with for many years, and through whom he has personally been sending his own money to meet urgent community needs.  In both cases they have shown a track record of coming back and providing evidence of the uses to which the money has been put, including videos and photographs and / or receipts relating to food or medical aid given out to needy people and the like.  One has the position of pastor (admittedly not always a proof of integrity, unfortunately) who has repeatedly shown evidence of considerable care for the needy in his care or area of influence.  The other is an activist in a relatively good job, who, for as long as we have known him, has shown care for the nearby poor Christian community in the city he lives in, and has always provided evidence of money use. 

 

The other director of the CIC is a Pakistani Christian, with many contacts and knowledge on the ground, and, if we receive sufficient regular funding that our initial two points of contact are getting enough to meet the needs in their areas, we will look first to contacts known by this other director. 


Where we are approached for help from individuals not well known to us, we will investigate and vet as carefully as we can using our contacts on the ground, and will only support them once we have good evidence that they are on the up and up and can genuinely meet urgent needs on the ground. 

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